St. Matthew says that Joseph knew her not till she brought forth her first-born son. I., 25.

Nor did he. And the expression “till” in Hebrew usage has no necessary reference to the future. Thus in Gen. VIII., 7, we read that “the dove went forth from the ark and did not return till the waters dried up.” That expression does not suggest that it returned then. It did not return at all, having found resting places. Nor doe3 the expression first-born child imply that there were other children afterwards. Thus Exodus says, “Every first-born shall be sanctified unto God.” Parents had not to wait to see if other children were born before they could call the first their first-born!781. Matt. XIII, 55-56, says, “His brethren James and Joseph, and Simon and Judes and His sisters, are they not all with us?”The Jewish expression “brothers and sisters of the Lord” in Scripture merely refers to relationship in the same tribe or stock. Cousins often came under that title. In all nations the word brother has a wide significance, as when one Mason will call another a brother-mason without suggesting that he was born of the same mother. The same St. Matthew speaks explicitly of “Mary, the mother of James and Joseph” in XXVII., 56, obviously alluding to a Mary who was not the mother of Jesus but who was married to Cleophas, the brother of Joseph.

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The Case for Catholicism - Answers to Classic and Contemporary Protestant Objections

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